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for them to add that i think is what's a problem for our system. >> was the future for priorities the u.s.a. by the way. what do you imagine doing? >> this is a big team effort. we brought on mary beth and paul and jeff. some of us can't just pull look, we are spending these next days and weeks talking about what happened next force. we built up somewhat of a brand in washington at least and we have a donor base and it doesn't seem like crossroads is going away or the chamber will stop spending money. so we're thinking about what's the best next step. >> so that's the future, is life for the super pacs. they turn into lobbying organizations because they've got all these people. they're being i assume paid enough to pay the rent, and they have a brand. that's exactly what you're hearing from american crossroads. plus the addition that to the extent they're doing this through nonprofits they actually need to lobby to keep their irs status. they have done all this campaign activity and that sec for they need to produce lobbying and noncampaign activity to prove the the iris they aren't just
's a double feature this afternoon, and i have the privilege of also introducing to you our next speaker, u.s. senator-elect ted cruz from texas. it was two years ago when ted cruz came up to me and others here in this room saying he was contemplating a run for the u.s. senate and asked for reaction. trying hard not to pour water over ted's noble commitment to public service, i resisted what would roll out of our topings -- tongues when a friend confronts us with advise. are you crazy? do you have a fever? have you sought professional help for this behavior? [laughter] taking a slightly different tact, i asked the usual questions. is it the right time politically? do you think the money's there? is your family prepared for this? have you checked all the necessary boxes back home in texas? now, as any of you know ted would guess, looked reflective and discerning at the questions, but you knew he was optimistic and just raring to go. he wanted to do this. from the experiences with the bush campaign and his bid for attorney regime, he knew he was ready for the political fray, and while he probab
it with the discipline i come from an information technology career of over 30 years. i worked at u.s. special operations command as the director of the staff i know what it takes to get this stuff done, and five years, gentleman is totally unacceptable. and i don't really have a question for you. i just want you to fix this for crying out loud. >> can i respond? congressmen coming you and i but primarily roger baker and you have had this discussion. i work with you and we believe we have the good mark on architecture and i haven't satisfied you. we will come back and work on it again. >> mr. turner? >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for being here. i appreciate your leadership i want to particularly thank you for your work on sexual assault which and you were working on with the secretary of the va in your efforts to change the culture throughout the dod to prevent sexual assault and assist the victims. the members have been of service members and families transition and out of the military secretary panetta of the most important things transition with a family is obviously that raises the issue of
is president and ceo of the windstream corporation, he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you. >> just ahead, a series of discussions by the world affairs council of america exploring national security issues facing the u.s. up first, former national security adviser steven hadley. he talks about the economic impact on national security. then a panel of former ambassadors discusses relations between the u.s. and pakistan. after that former middle east envoy dennis ross talks about iran, israel and u.s./middle east policy. and later, a look at the aftermath of the arab spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiativ
in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would have a better position on immigration, from the get-go, from the primary governor romney would've been competitive and it would've been competitive in those battleground states where the latino vote was decisive. and, finally, we have to stop being rockefeller republicans. we are not the party of the 47%. you know, when governor romney said what he did last week that obama won because it gives to latinos and other
in the u.s. to be detained without charge or trial. the f.b.i. and other law enforcement agencies have proven time and time again that they are up to the challenge of detecting, stopping, arresting and convicting terrorists found on u.s. soil. having successly arrested, -- successfully detained, arrested, convicted hundreds of these heinous people both before and after 9/11. for example, since january, 2009, 98 individuals have been successfully arrested inside the united states by the f.b.i. and other federal or local law enforcement officers on terrorism-related charges. last month, staff of the senate intelligence committee compiled a list of the 95 individuals arrested in the past four years as part of more than 50 different terrorism investigations. the list was based on publicly available information from the f.b.i., the congressional research service and media reports. and i have it here and i would like to enter that list into the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. feinstein: thank you very much. it is also important to understand that suspected terrorists w
, and if we don't tackle these threats, the u.s. and other nations will pay the price in the form of lost economic growth and development, stifled innovation and social progress and diminished opportunity. so i will describe those threats and talk about what needs to happen for us to keep the global internet on the right path. to harness the opportunities new communications, technologies to benefit all. there's a lot that about the relationship between communications technologies and world events, but in some important ways the relationship between the mutations, technology and world history has always been a profound one. the printing press was a new communications technology that changed the world. it won't take us back that far, but for a few minutes i will take us back 50 years to a powerfully important speech given by an fcc chairman in 1961. that made president john f. kennedy's. , newton minnow, spoke to the national association of broadcasting. his speech generally remembered for the declaration that tv had become a vast wasteland. but the speech, and i recommend reading it was ac
that there was a very large conspiracy, usually involving figures in the u.s. government, and a massive cover-up. >>> democratic national committee chairman wasserman-schultz celebrated gains for women in the election for the first time there are no all male state legislatures and 81 women in the u.s. house and 20 in the senate. representative wasserman-schultz spoke at an event hosted buy emily's list for about one hour and 20 minutes. >> since we have a devotee situated i realize we are a standing room only. it's great. thank you all for joining - stephanie schriock. [applause] and i am the president of emily's list. [applause] thank you on behalf of emily's list for joining us this morning. we are so, so excited to be here. can i just start by saying we won. [applause] and we won across the board. it was a historic night, just a little over a week ago, and we wanted to bring folks together today to share in a celebration but also to talk a little bit about what we learned through this election as we move forward. it's really about women, it's about moving voters and women candidates and th
to equip the new immigrants with the skills they need to make it in the u.s.. for example as richard mentioned by making sure that they and their children receive effective english language instruction. we tend to talk a lot about what to do about illegal immigrants who are already here whether to provide them with what some people call the legalization and other people call amnesty and on both sides lot of the arguments or moral. one group suggesting legalization would erode the rule will fall and another saying it's the status quo that undermines the rule of law and decides that he man to lead to a humanitarian duty to regulate the status of the people who come here over the last few decades. well, my own reading of the polls is that the answer is that people give to a lot of questions depend a lot on the wording of the question which suggests to me the polls are useful for identifying some impulses that are strong in the public and not so much for finding specific policies. the impression i have is that most people are not opposing the principal to allowing people who've been here
will not changey law or compromise u.s. sovereignty. it will not lead to any new lawsuits because its terms do not create any new rights and it cannot be enforced in any united states court. for families that choose to educate their children at home, the treaty will not change any of the current rights and obligations under american law. i was pleased that in -- leading pro-life groups like the national write to life committee confirm that the treaty does not promote, expand access, or create any right to an abortion. when we tried to move in treaty earlier this year, some objected on the basis that the senate really shouldn't ratify a treaty during a lame-duck session. well, we did a little study. i want to moat for the record that since 1970 in the last 42 year, the senate has ratified at least 19 treaties during lame-duck sessions. there's no procedural justification for not ratifying this treaty that could mean so much to those living with disabilities. thanks to decades of bipartisan cooperation, our country embodies the worldwide gold standard for those living with disabilities. in closi
that is not a foreign policy. you know, it sounds like he's talking about the u.s. being out front first, and the you know, the rest being alone. i think this administration came in and found a number of our alliances and partnerships afraid in the post-iraq period because of, you know, the previous years and the previous administration. and i think this president has sought to adopt an approach to american leadership that really inspires and enabled others to step up and contribute alongside us. on the theory that that collective action on the part of the international community is much more effective in dealing with the kind of threats and challenges that we face today. you can see it in the 49 nation coalition that's been built in afghanistan. you can see it with regard to how we've gone after al qaeda globally with partners on the ground. we can see it in the most crippling sanctions regime ever put in place with regard to iran, where countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. a
whatsoever with congress on either side. u.s. virtually no interaction with members of congress. wow. >> let me, mark, let me just add, first of all, i don't agree with anything charlie just said. now, i agree with everything charlie just said. the key may be whether the president shows decisive leadership. now, i don't know what you all think they're i don't know what charlie thinks. i don't think that decisive leadership necessary is what is shown a lot of the time in the first term. it's not that he didn't show any leadership. he staked out general positions, suggestions, ideas, philosophies, the health care reform. but he didn't get his hands really dirty. remember the public option fight we had. where was the president? if you send it to me, i'll sign it. you know, he let nancy pelosi take the lead on the public option. and on a lot of things, you know, we knew where he stood. he didn't twist arms. he just didn't seem to get involved in the details. is he going to do that now? if he does that, easy going to just come his idea of well, i've got a second term, we picked up seats and since
that there was a very large conspiracy usually involving figures in the u.s. government and a massive cover-up. >> literally 82 days. he presided over the seine at an hour days the vice president doesn't bother with that. he was there every day presiding everything from fdr with the transition of ciro knowledge. that doesn't happen anymore. got a phone call from the white house, get to the phone right away and at the other and they said get to the white house as soon as you can. so he grabbed his hat and he dashed out and he had a car of course he was to get upstairs to the second floor which was the family for and he looked up and said the president is dead and he was in total shock and he said what can i do for review and he said what can we do for you? you are in trouble now. >> we look at the life of harry truman now for our federal election commission chairman potter on super pacs and a discussion hosted by the atlantic, the astana institute and the newseum part of their washington ideas for rum. it's about a half-hour. >> so, next we are going to find out whether the billionaires' got
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
to be a bigger and more difficult issue and it deserves more than 10 seconds, but particularly the attacks on u.s. corporations and intellectual property is the core problem. on some national dialogue i think it's a very interesting interesting subject and a great question. i think there's a lot that could be done in the investment area and relating to that in the ipr area. it's been more successful at the subnational level than the national level. governors and china want to invest more than their national governments want to encourage it. and, perhaps you can use leverage to improve icr performance at the regional level in china which is where the real problem lies oic real possibilities here. >> please join me in thanking this terrific panel. [applause] >> could i just note it as was mentioned before we have a really exceptional book event opportunity nine days from that day in the afternoon on wednesday, november 28. we will be putting out an announcement. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversation
that we're going. as the largest fuel consumer in the world today and by far the largest in the u.s. government, as i said, 93%, the department of defense has a special role to play, and moreover, because of our dependence on foreign sources of energy we continually send our men and women in uniform in harm's way to maintain that access to oil. the second criticism we often hear is that biofuels are too expensive. now, it is true that advanced biofuels are not yet in full production and so they can't compete with oil, since the oil market is a hundred years old, but d.o.d. investment has caused the price to drop dramatically over the last two years, and biofuels are more immune from price shots than -- than oil. there are also significant costs to traditional foreign sources of energy that are not shown at the gas pump. those costs are associated with protecting our shipping lanes and oil supplies and for over 60 years we've been trolling the -- patrolling the persian gulf, these costs for oil remain underappreciated. for our military the issue of energy security investment in biofu
on the u.s. military and diplomatic officials, to keep us safe and well. 9/11 brought terrorism to our homeland. two wars in iraq and afghanistan have placed around 60 million people in the taliban military. the current outbreak of new, dangerous infectious disease test our ability of strength. the commitment of america's health challenges on hiv/aids, malaria has elevated global health to a new and costly u.s. foreign policy subjective. for the leaders, using these commitments is not only the right thing to do but make sense at a strategic level. >> security has very closely tied together a very basic level we've recognized the health of the country is clearly linked to their prosperity and their productivity and their economic well-being. that is key to the stability. >> here at csis the one to understand the decade teach about the nexus between health and security. the senior men and women in our government and military have grappled with these issues. admiral william fallon, former head of both u.s. pacific and central command, spearheaded military engagement during a 48 year caree
and jim johnson. we have jim shelton, at the u.s. department of the education. the department, jim manages most of the competitive programs including i-3 and promise neighborhoods. previously he served as program direct or for education at the bill and melinda gates foundation and was the east coast lead for new schools venture fund and co-founder of learn now. finally with have with us eric westendorf, cofound other and ceo of learnzillion. eric incubated the learnzillion at haines public charter school in washington, d.c., one of of the highest performing charter schools where wes was chief academic officer and principal. let's get started. eric, and raquel i will ask you guys to go ahead and kick this off. real simple question. both of you are executives at for-profit education companies. we just heard parent revolution point out that the challenge with for-profits perhaps stakeholders will take precedence every the kids. why do education as a for-profit rather than a nonprofit? eric? >> great. so, let me, let me first start by just saying what learnzillion is and then answer the questi
candidates for u.s. senate. rick berg and heidi heitkamp. i'm stacy sturm with the league of women voters, and i will be your moderator this evening. joining me on the panel is the special sections editor for the bismarck tribune and lawrence king, an attorney and also a member of the bismarck school board. this evening's debate takes place at horizon middle school in bismarck and has been organized by the league of women voters. it's co-sponsored by dakota media access and the bismarck tribune. the league of women voters is a nonpartisan organization and promotes the informed participation of all citizens in their government. this is intended to be a respectful exchange of ideas. our purpose this evening is to provide voters with information about the candidates and their positions on the issues that affect the people of north dakota. the audience here tonight is asked to, please, reserve applause or any reaction or comments until the forum has ended. tonight's debate forum will be as follows: each candidate will have 90 seconds to respond to each question. following responses to the que
, not the u.s. government, because i'm about to hammer them. we do not have the kind of leadership that required to have coalitions put together to deal with this situation. it is a soft power or hard power. and it may not happen properly anytime in the near future your remember that caveat. now, the other day i was reading through a book by save the children. it's about the children of syria. and if you haven't read this book and you want to understand what's happening in syria, i recommend you read it. but i assure you, you will feel very uncomfortable on page one. there are costs involved with the situation that could go on for generations, not just for now. generations. think about the children are going through now and how they will think about the west. the international community, their arab brothers, the reins, the russians, the chinese, the united states, and just about everyone else. even if this might be over in the next year or so, it will definitely not be over for those children. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. ambassador? >> i agree with most of what i heard from
of a public a a u.s. institution this year, and we were talking about counteroffers that his institution has to make. and he said that when he was lucky he could raise enough money to find enough money somewhere to match many salaries , but what he could not match was a condition -- the conditions of the building, the ability to produce the number of restaurants desired by faculty members to work with them, and he also could not match a coor's reduction where a private research president can offer pretty amazing packages overall to his star faculty. very hard for many public to match. and this turns out to be all over the place. as a result we see right now when you're talking about how you sustain excellence in scholarships, research, you see a lot of soul-searching going on in public higher education where institutions are trying to think about how private they can become. so many institutions have basically given up on the state. and as i was reminded here just this morning, there are institutions like the university of vermont that have done for years, straddled a public-private relation
, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector reform and egypt would weaken the security service more than it already is because there's been very little security sector reform as i don't see evidence of that. but also some of these the assumption that you are necessarily going after the leaders inside the security sector or security sector reform i think is a misconce
nations, was the weight to get alongside these afghans, and we saw -- i was in kabul when the two u.s. officers were shot in the national military police coordination center in the moi. there was an absolute bizarre for those who were present on the day to -- doug touched on this as proximity with the afghans, and it's very often the best form of defending against this form of attack. >> [inaudible] >> general, will you be able to achieve a successful withdrawal of u.k. combat troops by the end of 2014. >> i absolutely understand the investments, and there's a lot of material. my headquarters absolutely understand how much we have got to move over the time? >> the overall general plan of withdrawal, will you be able to be successful do you think? >> yes, i will. noting, of course, that the national operation is inside a wider nato operation, and a great deal of work is being done in nato to deliver that coordination. >> thanks. >> i want the to ask along the table, are we seriously led to believe that on the january the 1st, 2015, that the afghan national security forces will be susta
a membership organization. our website is www.eps u.s.a..org. and i would invite all of you who are here and all who may be watching to visit the website. and if you share the goals and objectives of the organization to join us, or to lend us your support. we have a great advantage in privilege of having a very strong supporter and great friend in bernard schwartz, after whom this symposium is named. bernard planned to be here this morning, was not able to get here, but i do want to say that we at eps are tremendously appreciative of the bernard, of your encouragement and your backing over quite a long time now, and though this symposium series. -- and other this symposium series. strip to essentials, the fiscal cliff is a device constructed in effect of course a rollback of social security, medicare, medicaid, among other programs. as the price of avoiding tax increases and disruptive cuts in federal civilian and in the military, it was partly fortuitous, given the expiration dates of the tax cut, but also partly policymaking by hostagetaking, timed for this moment following the 2012 el
'm announcing my decision as to which party, if any i will soothe with in my work here in the u.s. senate. before doing so i would like to outline my thinking on this issue and set out the principles that has guided my decision. in answering this, who will you caucus with question repeatedly with during the campaign, and i emphasize the word repeatedly, i established two basic criteria, that i wanted to maintain my independence as long and as thoroughly as possible, while at the same time being effective in my representation of maine. the first option i considered was whether i could literally go it alone. and not align myself with either party and operate entirely outside of the current partisan structure of the senate. although tempting in many ways, it is become apparent from extensive research into the senate rules and precedents as well as discussions with those familiar with the operations of the senate that this simply wouldn't be practical. and in fact, would severely compromise my ability to be effective on behalf of maine. the principle disadvantage of this go it alone approach
and u.s. army reserve. army guard, u.s. army reserve and active. reductions as we go forward. and so how do i look at this? there is characteristics that are important. and people get confused with what's going on the last five years with what want to have any future. in my mind, what happened in iraq and afghanistan is exactly how we decided to happen. the active component responded initially, was able to get things established and then as we need it more, we are able to move into the national guard, and u.s. army reserve to help us with that. and it's gained of them have a significant amount of experience. that worked very well. now, the way we are organized now in the army, the are some reserve and national guard units have to be ready to deploy very quickly. those tend to be combat service support outfits and combat support outfits that require much less training capability, because the guard and reserves issue is time. it's not money, it's time. they only have so much time to sustain readiness. so the characteristics of an active component is rapidly deployable, higher readiness, ab
politics? nine, ron paul says the election shows that the u.s. is now far gone. okay. but are we really seeing a strong resurgence of it to support her moxie with a hole that needs of new participants? and i think curtis gans may want to talk about it. and, finally, number 10, as we relate to substance, for our fiscal cliff and monumental decisions affecting the debt, deficit, sequestration, taxes, and everything else this country faces, one in the election result puts us closer to a solution? so given those 1015 questions that i don't know anybody in right on because i did myself lastly, i turned over to my distinguished colleague, john fortier. thank you all. >> now we will quiz the panelists on those questions, but what we're going to do, i'm going to introduce the panelist. each of us will give a five or six minute take on what we than most important about the election, we will have a little discussion and then go to the audience. i'm going to keep the buyers brief. you have them in your chairs, these are very accomplished people, if we spent all or someone that we would have anytim
that these tragedies require careful examination. i was a minimum of the u.s. house of representatives -- i was a member of the u.s. house of representatives when 235 u.s. marines died in a marine corps bear recollection bombing in beirut, lebanon. you bet we asked questions of the reagan administration, as we should when we lose american lives, innocent lives, overseas, as we did in lebanon and as we did in libya. what troubles me is the level the debate has reached. it has now preached a level of vilification and acould you scags which is unwarranted by the evidence. this week we met in the senate foreign relations committee in a closed, classified setting and went through meticulously the time line that led up to the death of the ambassador and his staff as well as what followed. it is being reported as it is being gathered, and there are additional reports that will be forthcoming. early next month, we are expecting the accountability review board of the department of state to issue its report. we know that following that, other committees of jurisdiction, the intelligence committee, fo
in the u.s. which are overpriced by oecd standards, not improving delivery system efficiency, but just rationing assets. if you had a separate, free-standing national conversation with no deadline, no sense of urgency what to do about the future of medicare and medicaid, and one group just said we want massive, permanent rationing of access to health care, again, that's not going to go anywhere. so if you favor cutting entitlements like social security and medicare and medicaid by methods like this, it makes perfect sense. you want to bury this in the fine print of legislation on another subject like averting the fiscal cliff. it's like putting a writer on something that has nothing to do with the defense department. that is i think the groups in the united states which for ideological reasons in the case of some parts of the financial industry for pecuniary or reasons want to cut social insurance and force people to buy more private, for-profit sector products like annuities or private health insurance. they know they can't win this argument if grand bargain is unbund med -- unbundled
$646 million in direct spending to this u.s. economy. fishing and00ing is not just recreation, it is a critical part of our economy. in montana, hunting and fishing alone brings $1 billion a year to our economy. nearly as much as the state's cattle industry. it drives and sustained jobs, and with hunting season in full swing and thousands of montanaians hunting in the back country over the thanksgiving weekend, this bill is as timely as ever. mr. president, the sports men's act of 2012 is balanced, bipartisan, and widely supported. it is also fiscally responsible. the bill has no cost. mr. president, before the senate went out of session, we voted to move forward with this bill by a vote of 84-7. 84-7. it was a resounding approval to preserve some of our most productive habitat, to pass on the hunting tradition and to entrust them with the land and water we share. now it's time to get this bill across the finish line, to approve a bill with widespread support that preserves our outdoor economy and secures our outdoor heritage or our kids and grand kids. it takes some good demo
section 2 of the u.s. constitutional amendment is a living wage that citizens are guaranteed the right to a living wage that provides an opponent with basic necessities including health care with a lifetime cap, and the second bill repeals obamacare and replaces it with a bill in which the employer has to put a portion of the employees wages and to help savings account, which can be used for minor health care spills into a retirement savings account so the employer is expected to pay for catastrophic health care with a lifetime cap for all employees and is a 1 million for lifetime. the government stays out of the whole business of health care the patient decides their budget issues and the medical issues. >> moderator: thank you. mr. macgovern? macgovern: i am strongly opposed to the affordable care act i think it's a huge mistake in the midst of a massive recession throwing people out of work and the economy on its knees to make a move to take over one-third of the economy and with respect to it, to me it was an absurdity. a 2700 page bill that you had to vote for it before you read i
code, the u.s. has become the highest tax rate country among all the developed countries in the world. so canada just lowered their rate from 16.5% to 15%. our rate is 39.2% when you combine the state and federal burden. federal burden 35%. state burden closer to 5%, 6%. so right now, the average among all the developed countries in the world is 25%, and the u.s. rate again stands at 39.2% when you combine state and federal. a similar trend is played out with respect to international tax rules because our trading partners including japan and britain have moved to a more competitive territorial like tax regime over the last ten years which encourages the movement of investment capital jobs overseas. so there is a simple point here which is by standing still the united states is falling behind and the resulting drag on american competitiveness and job creation is real and it's substantial. the solution is tax reform that broadens the tax base by scaling back tax preferences and cutting the corporate rate. we could cut it to 25%, scale back the deductions, the credits, the exemptions and
and use $160. in france you pay $38 u.s., and you get worldwide calling to 70 countries are not just u.s. and canada. you get worldwide television, not just domestic, and your internet is 20 times faster uploading and 10 times faster downloading, and your bank is than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand the fundamental principle, in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrial nation came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. the 20 century came along, it was highways, interstate highway program and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information superhighway. what does industry say? don't call it that anymore. >> david cay johnson on many with corporations try to rob you blind saturday night at 10 eastern in sunday night at nine on afterwards this weekend on c-span2's booktv. >> more booktv programming next your c-span2 from the annual national book festival, susan hertog presents her book, "dangerous ambition: rebecca west and dorothy thompson - new women in search of love and power."
happened to be a u.s. navy veteran of world war ii. white secretaries an upstair office windows extended thumb's down signs says baldwin to the marchers until suddenly many of them saw the stunningly handsome reigning matinee idol, harry belafa enrings -- belafani in the crowd. when they saw that beautiful cat, women demonstrated that america was the most desperately schizophrenic of republicans. [laughter] baldwin's story telling prose and his insight were never in better form. this was vintage james baldwin. race, sex, and his country all on extraordinary display and subject to his scorching ironic pen. those young women in the windows, baldwin declared, quote , could on the look forward to an alliance with the jeering businessmen, and they were, female, a word which in the colored curtain suffered the same feat -- fate as the word "male," and baldwin did not hiss his chance. when the girls saw harry, a collision occurred in them so visible to once be hilarious and yet utterly sad. the thumbs were down. they were barricaded within their skins. at the next moment, those downturned numbe
think are some concrete ways in which u.s. national security can be improved through help intervention beyond cross border infectious disease control. >> anybody care to take that one? >> i will be glad to respond. there has been a lot of debate. you and i have had a lot of debate in this area. we thank csi as for bringing us together. we never would have met otherwise. there's a wide diversity of opinion on this topic. it seems to me the global health security in terms of a rapidly expanding disease is something everyone would agree is something we should prevent. admiral fargo whose video early on was once asked why do all the cooperation stuff in the pacific? there are no wars going on. he said your point? he felt strongly by engaging other countries, talking about military, engage in other countries in peaceful areas we could have discussions would lead to a more stable likelihood of a more stable environment and i would put that forward as a way of engaging other countries and hopefully by closing the gap which i believe has happened over the last several years between the militar
're watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy events and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> recently vice president joe biden was in attendance at a pentagon announcement of a new virginia class fast-attack navy submarine that'll be called the uss delaware. it's expected to be launch inside 2018. speaking at this 20-minute briefing were second lady jill biden, navy secretary ray mabus and delaware senator tom carper. >> thank you all for coming today to the navy ship naming announcement. today's briefing will consist of statements only, there will be no questions and answers following the statement. along with secretary of the navy ray mabus, today we are honored to be joined by second lady, dr. jill biden, and her special guest, her husband, vice president biden. [laughter] senator tom carper and lieutenant governor matt denn. thank yo
u.s. house members that lost in their primaries as the purification process. that's the reason we have the subtitle in the book which is written not by me but by the others in the atlantic magazine having turned republicans and democrats and to americans is because they're focused on party tom and north have come, too. when you look what happened to yesterday in indiana, lugar losing and i think there was a terrible thing that he lost but when he lost he lost in the republican primary when robert bennett lost in utah. when mike castle lost in delaware and the republican primary i don't know what would have happened of lugar would have been able to run among all of the voters in indiana but we have created a system here in which the parties themselves can prevent the voters to be able to choose among other options you have the parties that are dominated by the people that have the most partisan, the most ideological and that is what moves the process forward. they do that in the congressional redistricting and in how the parties choose. i think tom is a great guy. he's very smart.
of the countries. how much influence are we actually exercising? >> the question is about the extent of u.s. influence in each of the cases. why don't we reverse the order. what is your sense in libya and egypt and tunisia? >> it is quite high in terms of -- [inaudible] >> you are fading in and out. is it a microphone a shoe? is it the connection? >> is this more clear? >> that is good. >> in the case of libya the government clearly asked for assistance, they are looking for technical assistance and [inaudible] -- influence in terms of experience muslims learn from other countries. very important for sovereignty of libya and the population that the gnc made a decision and what we see particularly have been very clear that there's a need to support it. >> in addition, libya has resources that facilitate these relationships in ways that other countries might not. egypt one of the two. >> in the case of egypt we have a tremendously close enduring relationship with the security sector. that is political and financial relationship and there are levers. the debate is how to exercise those levers.
will be live starting at 2 p.m. eastern, also on c-span3. here on c-span2, the u.s. senate gavels in and about half an hour at 9:30 a.m. eastern. they are expected to continue working on the 2013 defense programs policy bill, possible debate on 100th a minute and "roll call" votes happening throughout the day. senate lawmakers also continuing work on the floor on the fiscal cliff. majority whip senator dick durbin spoke about bipartisan negotiations to try to avoid the fiscal cliff at an event earlier this week at the center for american progress. we will show you as much of this as we can into the senate gavels in at 9:30 a.m. >> we are thrilled to have senator durbin to talk about his views on the fiscal cliff, and the framework. i think as we engage in this debate i just want to let a few things that are critical. as washington becomes obsessed with this issue. first and foremost, i think it will have consequences and that cap we have argued that the issues that are really framing the fiscal debate and fiscal cliff are ones that were actually dictated in the election context. the president
-span. up next, a house debate with u.s. representative and former republican presidential candidate michele bachmann and her democratic challenger, jim graves to represent minnesota's 6th congressional district. then at 9 a.m. eastern we are live with an analysis of the competitive house and senate races with two former congressmen, republican tom davis and democrat martin who each chaired their respective parties' campaign committees. >> when i watch c-span, i watch the morning journal. i like the give and take there. i like the balanced approach. and i also like to hear the callers. i don't call myself, but i like to hear the callers. some of them are unusual, to say the least. some of them are thought-provoking too. c-span is everywhere. c-span in washington is just at every event, you know, small hearing, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in many 1979 -- in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> now, representative michele bachmann faces
provide that 5 million jobs in the u.s., and they tend to -- your story aside they tend to be fairly high jobs, relatively high-paying jobs. they tend to be weighted towards the manufacturing sector, and so to the extent that we haven't really on the national scale at least at the federal government level, come up with a systematic way of trying to promote ourselves as a destination and there are certainly a lot of reasons beyond the cost of labor companies look to invest here and that has to do with education level, it has to do with putting the challenges aside some of the top educational institutions in the world. we have a legal system that protect investor rights, we have intellectual property rights that are very robust so there are other reasons companies look to invest and that's something we are trying to encourage around the world. the title of this is dillinger and opportunities and i think you leave out some of the challenges very well. one of the great opportunities and we don't know what the scale or the scope will be with shale gas and what we might see in the coming decade
they selected the officer that had the best sense of smell to go to the door so they were not really going -- u.s said knock and talk is okay. >> they are okay but under your hypothetical it appears that the knock and talk wasn't really what the officer was going up for. >> you are on a really slippery slope with that answer. there is still a motive with everything the police officers do. they are not to hold the person comes to the door and that they can see something from the door. they always have a motive, you are suggesting what? in terms of our rule deselect everybody with a sense of smell because they have a tip of drugs in the house that we given that situation? the assumption that they went to investigate? >> the rule and asking the court to rely on is not the intent of the police officer. the rule and asking the officer -- >> he asks the neighbor who are you? i've gotten a report and i am selling drugs. i know you have drugs in there. >> that would be fine. it would be planas now. >> if it smells first and ask the question second that's not okay? >> what's not okay is if he goes up ther
you. [applause] ♪ >> the u.s. senate dabbles in today about an hour from now at 10:00 eastern and today they will continue working on legislation dealing with equal rights for persons with disabilities. majority ritter harry reid hopes the senate to work, 2013 defense program. off of the 4 u.s. ambassador susan rice meet with republican senators discussing the september attack on the consulate in benghazi, libya and she will talk with susan collins and senator bob corker. yesterday she sat down with senator mccain, gramm and ayat. senator mccain told reporters the information she gave the american people was incorrect, but a spontaneous demonstration triggered by hateful video. it was not and there was compelling evidence that the time that was certainly not the case. the house transportation and infrastructure committee is holding at hearing on amtrak's restructuring plans. the committee will hear from the inspector general and amtrak's president and representative from the united transportation union live at 10:00 eastern on our companion network c-span. [applause] >> last n
much of the u.s. cable coverage that i was seeing about the drug war, especially in this part of the country, to me seemed woefully decontextualized. it felt like rubbernecking body count journalism. x number of people were shot on the state. this person was be headed there, but no context. no background, no history, the deepening of the story. i'm by no means a expert on mexico's drug war, but i did have a very strong interest in this region and in. i began researching as early as -- in itjuana. i began researching in 2007 while looking for another story. unlike other journalists, who do not have the amount of time that you often need to tell the stories, when i was in production i had a little over two years to spend with the story. that is enough time to deepen your sense of a place, an institution, to gain trust and to hopefully have a deeper narrative. whether or not i succeeded at -- or failed is up to the audience and the people who push back on my perspective, but for me the ability to spend time with an issue, too deep and your understanding of that issue, provide the
for stabilizing the financial situation in the u.s.. so the president of a believe after the spring meeting really resolved to provide the leadership to make this happen. we talked about the time line that started with a meeting in may with the president invited congressional leaders on to the white house on may 10th and we started with an initial negotiation on may 14th. some of the process really took a little bit less than six months from the time it was triggered in the white house to the time the little station was signed. that may sound like a long time but considering how long we have been struggling over our recent battles, it seems now with a little bit of hindsight to be fairly efficient in terms of that process. i would like to talk a but more in detail about the fact that there were two agreements. because the fact that there were two agreements, the reason for them, the way they were achieved and the implications of the two agreements really have a great deal of information and a great deal of lessons if you will to understand how to do and perhaps how not to do what we need to accomp
job, economic growth and job creation. in sum, the u.s. economy continues to be tampering by the lingering effect of the financial crisis on its productive potential and by a number of headwind is that have hindered the normal cyclical adjustment of the economy. the federal reserve is doing its part by providing accommodative monetary policy to promote a stronger economic recovery in the context of price stability. as i've said before, however, while the monetary policy can help support economic recovery it is by no means a panacea for our economic ills. currently uncertainty that the situation in europe and especially about the prospect for the federal fiscal policy seems to be weighing on the steady decision of households and businesses as well as on financial conditions. such uncertainties will only be increased by the discourse and delay. in contrast, cooperation and creativity deliver fiscal clarity in particular a plan for resolving the nation's longer-term budgetary issues without harming the recovery. to help meet the new year is very good one for the american econ
in stoneridge. does the u.s. have a special relationship with israel? gibson: it is a special relationship. as a young man, 26 years old in the persian gulf war, as we were making our move up towards iraq and having the opportunity for a few minutes to listen to the bbc and here that some of those were landing in israel, i will tell you that at that point, the student of history and i feared for regional and maybe even a world war. we asked israel at that moment to do something that no country should never ask another country. that was not retaliate. israel did that. even though they had people killed and property destroyed. they did that for us. i cannot even adequately describe. i could not fully understand. i could certainly receive the information, but i could not understand. i will never forget that. it is a very special relationship and we share the same values and democratic process. israel is a friend that we will always be there for. proud to support the agreement that we have with them, making sure that they are prepared to defend themselves, just about $3 billion a year and 70%
entirely tied to the fiscal cliff -- >> the u.s. senate is about to meet for a brief pro forma session. we will return to this discussion on the fiscal cliff after that. this is a pro forma session of the senate. no legislative business is plan. most senators have gone on the thanksgiving holiday break. they are meeting every three days during this break in a pro forma session. the house is in session. legislative work wrapping up today, working on a bill to normalize trade relations with russia. this is live senate coverage on c-span2. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c., november 16, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the senate stands adjourned until 12:00 p.m. on tuesday, november 20, 2012. adjourn: >>
that karl rove was the big loser of 2012. we have to add another name to that, scott reid. the u.s. chamber of commerce won about one or 14 or 15 senate races they played in. it also intervened in the missouri race in the primary, and their candidate lost to todd akin. so even with all that money, it didn't effect the races that the democrats knew about this outside money which they didn't know in 2010 and were prepared themselves. they had their own super pacs, their own outside groups, and they were able to win a lot of those races and, basically, money they were on parity. >> thank you, jonathan. i'm going to turn it over to jim pinkerton who served in the reagan and bush administrations. he's also a political analyst with the fox news channel, and he's a regular on fox news. so what do you think happened last night, and what does it mean for america? >> well, thank you, jennifer. and i apologize for being late. i was late for reasons i'll get into in a moment. um, you know, look, i worked in the political affairs office under ed rollins way back in the stone age, so i can never resist s
right now, i think the foundation for u.s. helps the economy, create jobs, gives consumers a certainty which means gives businesses confidence, that they're going to consumers during the holiday season, is if we right away say 90% of americans are not going to see their taxes go up. 97% of small businesses are not going to see their taxes go up. if we get that in place we are actually removing half of the fiscal cliff. half of the danger to our economy is removed by that single step. and what we can then do a shape a process whereby we look at tax reform, which i'm very eager to do. i think we can simplify our tax system. i think we can make it more efficient. we can't eliminate loopholes and deductions that have a distorting effect on our economy. i believe that we have to, to continue to take a serious look at how we reform our entitlements. because health care costs continue to be the biggest driver of our deficits. so, there is a package to be shaped, and i'm confident that parties, folks of good will in both parties can make that happen. but what i'm not going to do is to extend b
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